The number of planes that have gone missing in the Bermuda Triangle is the same as anywhere in the world on a percentage basis: scientist

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After 70 years of superstitious speculations around disappearance of ships and planes in the Bermuda Triangle, an Australian scientist has come out and claimed that there was no mystery in Bermuda Triangle in the first place, reported an Australian news website news.com.au.

In a statement to the website, Dr. Karl Kruszelnicki pointed out that the number of planes that have gone missing in the Bermuda Triangle is the same as anywhere in the world on a percentage basis and has nothing to do with aliens or fire-crystal from the lost city of Atlantis. Instead, he believes that human error is responsible for people going missing in the region.

The Bermuda Triangle stretches over 700,000km of sea from Florida to Puerro Rico and the island of Bermuda in the North Atlantic Ocean. In the past 100 years, this mysterious part of the world is known behind disappearance of at least 20 planes and 50 ships, with about loss to 1000 human lives.

He said: “The Bermuda Triangle covers a large 700,000 square-kilometre (swathe of ocean, it is also a particularly busy patch of sea. It is close to the Equator, near a wealthy part of the world – America – therefore you have a lot of traffic.”

Keeping all that in mind, when one would compare the number of disappearances to the large quantity of ships and planes passing through the Bermuda Triangle, you find there is nothing out of the ordinary about the area at all, he added.

Dr. Kruszelnicki holds a fellowship at Sydney University for communication science to the broader community and is author of The Doctor, which is based on his “quest to unearth scientific truths”, reported the Australian news website.

Commenting on the disappearance of Flight 19 on December 5, 1945, he said: “Flight19’s leader Lieutenant Charles Taylor was told to go west but instead chose to continue flying east.

“There was one experienced guy, the rest were inexperienced.

“If you read the radio transcripts some of the junior pilots are saying, ‘Why don’t we fly to the west?’, and the pilot says, ‘Why don’t we fly to the east?’” he said, suggesting Lt. Taylor was responsible for the flight’s fate.

“(Lt. Taylor) arrived with a hangover, flew off without a watch, and had a history of getting lost and ditching his plane twice before.

“The plane that went to rescue then went missing was seen to blow up.

“It didn’t vanish without a trace.”

Source : http://www.deccanchronicle.com