1

The relations between the two nuclear-armed countries, North Korea and the United States, is getting more and more militaristic with both sides sending open warnings of war. With the two sides getting verbally aggressive with each other, the US pulls in China calling upon Xi Jinping to be more aggressive in its retaliation to North Korea. 

As tension regarding North Korea’s missile tests ramps up in Washington, the reaction becomes all the more vitriolic and threatening. But despite the threats from the US, North Korea is unlikely to change its behaviour and attitude towards threatening issue of nuclear arms. Given this political setup, is there an impending war in the corner or is the current flow of passions on all sides temporary that will subside with time? What role will the international community play as tempers on both sides go high? 

President Donald Trump on April 11, 2017, posted on his Facebook page and also tweeted that the US will “solve the North Korea problem” alone if China refuses to help. In his tweet, Trump categorically said, “North Korea is looking for trouble. If China decides to help, that would be great. If not, we will solve the problem without them! USA”

The move has already raised tensions in the region and among the concerned countries. Retaliating to the deployment of the US naval strike group, North Korea issued a response, saying that it would counter “reckless acts of aggression” with “whatever methods the US wants to take.”

The rerouting was in response to North Korea’s missile test on April 5, 2017. The move of sending US strike carrier group by the US has already raised tensions in the region and among the concerned countries.

North Korea tests missile on April 5, claiming that it can reach Australia.

The Pentagon had sent 97,000-ton USS Carl Vinson along with a guided-missile cruiser and two destroyers. An official statement to CNN, read, “We will make the US fully accountable for the catastrophic consequences that may be brought about by its high-handed and outrageous acts.”

n this backdrop, China moved 150,000 troops to its border, soon after Donald Trump had sent warships to North Korea to tighten the screws on nuclear tests and threats. An unnamed spokesman from North Korea’s Office of Foreign Ministry said, “This goes to prove that the US reckless moves for invading the DPRK (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea) have reached a serious phase, further asserting, “The DPRK is ready to react to any mode of war desired by the US.” Fearing an attack from the US, medical and backup units have been deployed from People’s Liberation Army to handle North Korean refugees.

Reacting to the US troops stationed in Pohang in South Korea, North Korea in a furious reaction said, “We will hold the US wholly accountable for the catastrophic consequences to be entailed by its outrageous actions.” The Foreign Ministry spokesman concluded by saying, “We will take the toughest counteraction against the provocateurs in order to defend ourselves by the powerful force of arms.”

midst the cacophony of action to be taken against North Korea, US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson during an interview to CBS’ Face the Nation on April 9, 2017, said that China understands how dangerous North Korea’s nuclear program has become and agrees action must be taken to stop it. “I think even China is beginning to recognise that this presents a threat to even China’s interests,” Tillerson, adding, “President Xi clearly understands, and I think agrees, that the situation has intensified and has reached a certain level of threat that action has to be taken.”

As international politics surrounding North Korea’s military and nuclear designs gain strength, what needs to be seen if Washington and Pyongyang will actually go for a war? In the meantime, the international community can play a constructive and pacifist role to avoid any kind of military adventurism.