Plants are able to “remember” and “react” to information contained in light, according to researchers. … And the response, which took the form of light-induced chemical reactions in the leaves, continued in the dark. This showed, they said, that the plant “remembered” the information encoded in light

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Plants Really Do Respond to The Way We Touch Them, Scientists Reveal. It’s something that plant lovers have long suspected, but now Australian scientists have found evidence that plants really can feel when we’re touching them.

“Plants may lack brains, but they do possess a sophisticated … signaling network.” Could there be some chemical or hormonal “unifying mechanism” that supports memory in plants? … Plants, they insist, are mainly genetic robots, they can’t learn from experience or change behavior.

All plants are intelligent since they have electrical and chemical signalling systems which possess memory and exhibit brainy behavior in the absence of brains. The most intelligent plant is the mimosa pudica or the sensitive plant.

Plants are far more intelligent and capable than we have given them credit for. In fact, provocative research from 2010 published in Plant Signaling & Behavior proposes that since they cannot escape environmental stresses in the manner of animals, they have developed a “sophisticated, highly responsive and dynamic physiology,” which includes information processes such as “biological quantum computing” and “cellular light memory” which could be described as forms of plan.

There are living trees that germinated long before Jesus Christ was born. What sort of life wisdom evolved in plants to make it possible to survive and propagate for so long a time in the same place they germinated?

According to the researchers, plants “plants actually work as a biological quantum computing device that is capable to process quantum information encrypted in light intensity and in its energy.” This information processing includes a mechanism for processing memorized information. For example: “Plants can store and use information from the spectral composition of light for several days or more to anticipate changes that might appear in the near future in the environment, for example, for anticipation of pathogen attack.”

According to the study, “plants can actually think and remember.” Moreover, plants not only possess a mechanism for information gathering and processing, but appear to exercise agency or “choice” vis-à-vis different scenarios:

“Different groups of chloroplasts and cells in the same leaf under identical constant and stable light, temperature and relative humidity condition have different opinions about ‘what to do’ in such conditions and tests different scenarios of possible future development.”

The study also offers an explanation for why plants absorb more light energy than is needed for photosynthesis alone:

“Another possible answer to the above question is a light training of young naïve leaves. Let’s imagine when young leaf or flower is emerging out of a plant, it would be nice for that leaf or flower to know about the conditions in which it is going to emerge. Older, more experienced leaves that actually are acclimated to outside conditions can train naïve emerging young leaves with the PEPS [photo electro physiological signaling] and cellular light memory mechanisms. This explains why plants possess a natural capacity to absorb more light energy than that required for photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. They need this absorbed energy in excess for optimization and training of light acclimatory and immune defenses.”

“Our results suggest that plants are intelligent organisms capable of performing a sort of thinking process (understood as at the same time and non-stress conditions capable of performing several different scenarios of possible future definitive responses), and capable of memorizing this training. Indeed leaves in the dark are able to not only “see” the light, but also are able to differently remember its spectral composition and use this memorized information to increase their Darwinian fitness.”

Recognizing that plants, for instance, have consciousness, or that their simple presence in our environment has healing effects, reintroduces an element of wonder and mystery back into the experience of the natural world. The researchers have also observed that the plants learned to control their electrical responses, indicating they had some rudimentary awareness of the music they were creating.