5 Year Old Gives Birth to a Healthy Baby

This story is truly a medical marvel — one that is surely hard to believe.

0

5% Discount Coupon: Unknown Tentsile

Being a mother has never been an easy job. What’s the right age according to you for becoming a mother is it 20’s or 30’s? This girl has brought a change in the perfect age of being a mother.

In 1939, a healthy young girl named Lina Medina gave birth to an equally healthy baby boy. The only noteworthy detail about this event was the mother’s age: she was five years old. Medina became, at the age of five years and seven months, the youngest girl known to have given birth. Medina’s son weighed 2.7 kg at birth. He was raised believing that Medina was his sister, but he found out at age 10 that she was his mother.

The real story of Lina Medina, World’s youngest confirmed mother, and of the circumstances surrounding her extraordinary tale give insight into both the society she grew up in and the vagaries of human biology.

It was although speculated that the case was a hoax, a number of doctors over the years have verified it based on biopsies, X rays of the fetal skeleton in utero, and photographs taken by the doctors caring for her.

The first photograph was taken around the beginning of April 1939, when Medina was seven-and-a-half months into pregnancy. Taken from Medina’s left side, it shows her standing naked in front of a neutral backdrop. This is the only published photograph of Lina taken during her pregnancy.

Lina’s parents at first thought that their daughter had abdominal tumor due to her increasing belly size. Not only her parents but even the doctors thought the same. Later they determined that she was in her seventh month of pregnancy. Dr Gerardo Lozada took her to Lima to have other specialists confirm that she was pregnant.

A month and a half after the original diagnosis, Medina gave birth to a boy by caesarean section. She was 5 years, 7 months, and 21 days old then. Lina’s father was arrested on suspicion of child sexual abuse, but he was released due to lack of evidence, and the biological father was never identified.

Lina Medina’s condition certainly came as a surprise to everybody who studied the case, but among pediatric endocrinologists, it wasn’t entirely unthinkable.

About one in every 10,000 children develops a condition known as “precocious puberty,” in which the child’s body reaches sexual maturity before age eight. Roughly ten times more girls than boys develop this way, and there is reason to suspect that it might be accelerated by sexual contact at an early age.

Later analysis strongly suggested that Medina may have reached menarche as early as eight months after birth, though other reports claimed she had been having regular menstrual periods from the age of three.

Examination of the five-year-old Medina showed that she already had developed breasts, wider-than-normal hips, and advanced (that is, post-pubescent) bone growth. To all appearances, at the time that Lina Medina got pregnant – right around her fifth birthday – her body was that of a very petite, immature woman.

After all she was a mother and had to feed her child and educate him. Doctors realized that she already had fully mature sexual organs from precocious puberty. Her menarche had occurred at eight months of age, in contrast to a past report stating that she had been having regular periods since she was three years old. In young adulthood, Medina worked as a secretary in the Lima clinic of Lozada, which gave her an education and helped put her son through high school. She later married Raúl Jurado, who fathered her second son in 1972.